Fine Cacao

Domori was the first chocolate manufacturer to use exclusively traditional cultivation methods with aromatic cocoa plants. A courageous choice, because these are the rarest, most delicate varieties with the least production yield. In fact, fine cocoa represents only 10% of the world cocoa crop, while Criollo, the rarest cocoa variety in the world, represents 0.001%.

The courage of this choice, not only enables Domori to produce a chocolate with a wide range of aromatic profiles, but also to respect and preserve the biodiversity of fine cocoa. Since the foundation, Domori has fought to protect these valuable varieties of cocoa, their natural habitat and the farmers who work on the plantations. In 2002, Domori invested in Hacienda San Josè, preserving seven different varieties of Criollo cocoa, creating a universal world heritage for its biodiversity.

To date fine cocoa can be divided into three different categories:

Criollo: cocoa of absolute purity, inimitable roundness. The annual quantity of Criollo cocoa cultivation, which amounts to 0.001% of the world's cocoa cultivation, suggests fragility but at the same time the value of this cocoa, which sits on top of the cocoa quality pyramid.

Trinitario: Represents 8% of the world cocoa harvest. The Trinitario is a hybrid of Criollo and Forastero (the most widespread and commercialized cocoa, but not classifiable as fine cocoa). This variety combines some aromatic and sensory varieties of Criollo with the strength and little fragility of the Forastero, giving life to a unique variety of cocoa.

Nacional: Also known as Arriba or Arriba Nacional, this fine cocoa is native to Ecuador. Although genetically a Forastero, it has enviable aromatic notes and is therefore classified as a fine cocoa. It represents 2% of the world harvest.

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